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Author Topic: Blood Testing for Nutrient Deficiencies  (Read 212 times)

Juggles

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Blood Testing for Nutrient Deficiencies
« on: October 11, 2018, 09:56:42 PM »

Hello, would like to ask if anyone has looked into or had their blood tested by an independent company to detect what levels need a hand ( Vit Bís, Cís etc) when in the menopause.
I am considering it, but Iím not sure how reliable they are.
Iím hoping that if I could identify the nutrients Iím lacking, I can be sure Iím taking to right ones and not second guessing.
Any opinions would be welcome.

Thank you
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Dancinggirl

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Re: Blood Testing for Nutrient Deficiencies
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2018, 07:52:28 AM »

Hi and welcome to mm
Donít spend money on having tests. Your GP can run a blood test to check for things like iron, B12, vitamin D defiency etc if itís needed.
Are you feeling tired and run down?
It is important to have a good diet  but when meno hits then one does need to focus a bit more to ensure you are getting enough of the right things. Cutting out as much sugar and saturated fats as possible is very important .
If like me you have a sensitive digestive system ( Iím also quite a fussy eater) and perhaps donít eat all the right things,  then simply taking a good multi vitamin wont do any harm. My brother-in-law is a gastroenterologist and insists we all take vitamin D, especially through the winter months, as this is vital for  many things and the main source of vitamin D is sunshine which few of us get enough of.
I also take Omega 3, although if you have oily fish 2-3 times a week you are possibly getting enough.
As Iím vegetarian I do take Feraglobin every day to ensure I get enough iron and B12.
Here are only a few vitamins you can OD on like vitamin A but our bodies will excrete anything we donít need from Vitamin supplements.
Eat plenty of vegetables, especially if they are green, fruit, eggs and fish with some dairy like a small chunk of cheese for the calcium. Eat plenty of fibre like whole grain cereals.  Eat some cashew nuts and a banana for your snacks and go for good brisk walks each day.  Take a few supplements Ďjust in caseí if you want. My theory is that our digestive system is less efficient as we age and the lack of oestrogen lowers our immune system, so boosting everything with some supplements may help.
Vitamin D and magnesium are well worth taking ( helps to absorb that calcium for our bones and boosts the immune system) and possibly add in calcium and Omega 3 for good measure BUT none of this can replace eating well.
There are plenty of good sites that offer advice on diet - do look at the sites like NHS Choises and not any site selling supplements.
The fact you are thinking about this shows you are wanting to do the right thing, so follow your instincts, get clued up on what foods you should be eating and then relax and enjoy life. DG x
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Juggles

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Re: Blood Testing for Nutrient Deficiencies
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2018, 08:17:48 AM »

Thanks for your reply Dancinggirl. 
I too am vegetarian and do try to eat a mainly plant based diet.
The GP Iíve seen has said that she wonít test for menopause or deficiencies as the protocol now is to prescribe and treat the symptoms the patient may have. 
If Iím honest I have no faith in her what so ever.
I have had PCOS since my early twenties, and have battled with my hormones for years.
Iíve been advised my a breast consultant to take evening primrose, a nurse has told me to take Vitamin B Complex. Someone else has recommended Vitamin D and Calcium. 
I feel that I should deal with this myself but just donít know where to start. I canít see the point in taking supplements that I donít need too.
Thanks for your advise x
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Dancinggirl

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Re: Blood Testing for Nutrient Deficiencies
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2018, 09:02:31 AM »

You are right - the advice can be very mixed and inconclusive but the problem with testing for nutrient deficiencies is that they would vary so greatly from one month to the next - there are so many factors involved e.g. the way you cook things, how your body digests and absorbs foods etc.
Have you had breast cancer?  Are you suffering with meno symptoms? Supplements or remedies wonít truly help with menopause symptoms but HRT will if you can take it and it will also boost the immune system and protect you heart and bones - for many women HRT is the best supplement as oestrogen is the oil that helps the engine to run smoothly.   

WE have to remember that menopause, and the problems that come with it, are a fairly modern issue.  A hundred years ago you were lucky to get to the menopause at all and if you did, you were either lucky and sailed through (as about 30-40% of women still do) or it was not uncommon for women to be put into asylums or they became permanent Ďinvalidsí. 

The medical profession firmly believe that a good diet should take care of all your bodies needs but there are many factors that can effect this. AS I explained before, I take the Ďjust in caseí approach and take the basic supplements that I know I COULD be deficient in. If vegetarian, then B12 and iron can be things that can be easily depleted and vitamin D is vital unless you get at least 15 mins of sunshine every day on skin that hasnít got sunscreen! If you are worried about bones then calcium with Magnesium and vitamin D can help. I do agree, you donít want to waste money but there is also something inside me that says - "donít go through life worrying about this too much - pop a few basic supplements as an insuranceĒ.

Why not simply concentrate on a good diet, now take any supplements and see how you feel - your body will tell you if you are deficient as youíll feel tired and run down.

Here are some good sites to look at for info.

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/balanced-diet-vegetarian

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/what-pioppi-diet

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vitamins-and-minerals/vitamin-d/

I mentioned to my brother-in-law that I thought an egg was like a vitamin pill and he said it probably is, as it has everything to grow and support a living thing.

Donít forget that appropriate exercise is as important as diet - 'if you donít use it you loose ití.

DG x
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CLKD

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Re: Blood Testing for Nutrient Deficiencies
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2018, 10:16:19 AM »

hi! don't waste money on anything that isn't offered via the NHS. 

Some ladies find that keeping a mood/food/symptom diary of use.  Also do read the links.  Make notes  ;)

18 months ago both Mum [91 and counting  ;D] and I were really tired.  I would so 20 mins. weeding outside and then have to sit absolutely still for 2 hours  :-\.  She had her bloods tested and was low on VitD so I had mine done and yep, VItD was low.  Despite the fact that we both spend a lot of time outside.  Prescribed VitD capsules did the trick for me. 

There is also crashing fatigue which I remember Mum having - she would sit down and suddenly drop off to sleep. HORMONES  >:(

Maybe jot down for 3 days what you eat and drink and see if there are additions that you could make, for example I LOVE roasted veg..  Sliced/diced, coated with black pepper and olive oil and slowly done in the oven ;-).  Enough to eat cold with salad the next day.  We have several threads on exercise, food, diets, pets here ........ browse round.

Let us know how you get on.  My Gynae won't do blood tests preferring to go on symptoms.
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