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Author Topic: Underactive thyroid  (Read 12149 times)

CLKD

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #45 on: December 03, 2016, 01:05:38 PM »

Countrybumpkin - have you talked to your GP about a discussion with an endo.?  Or find out which Hospital locally has the appropriate dept. and ring the Secretary for advice?  A one-off private appt. might be the way to go?
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babyjane

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #46 on: December 03, 2016, 02:57:18 PM »

Yep, Goldshield's thyroxine was Eltroxin.  I was on it for 10 years and was distraught when it was no longer available when Mercury Pharma took over Goldshield.  They swore that their generic was exactly the same as Eltroxin and the ingredients list was the same, but no way was it the same stuff!!  >:(  My levels went haywire and I know I was not the only one.  Actavis and Wockhardt seem to be the better of the generics.  Stay away from Accord  ::) 

Hope you keep well also countrybumpkin x
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Katejo

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #47 on: December 03, 2016, 03:17:39 PM »

countrybumpkin was that Eltroxin?  that is what I had and when it was withdrawn and replaced with a generic I became very unstable.  what you have been told about different absorption rates and the 10% difference is quite true as I was told the same by my endo.

I have found a generic brand that works for me and the endo has instructed my GP to specify the generic brand - Actavis - on my prescription. Apparently Wockhardt is also a reliable generic. I have the same issue with my propranolol and that has also been specified.  GPs have to follow recommendations from consultants and if a brand is specified on the prescription the pharmacy has to source it if they don't stock it, whereas they don't have to if you just ask for it.  Are you under a consultant endo?

I found generic ranitidine gave me nausea and terrible gastric pain but if I buy Zantc myself it is fine so this surely proves there is a difference in the quality between generics and branded products.
Eltroxin was the version which we had as kids and teenagers . I forget just how long ago it switched to Levo but it was a long time ago. I liked the taste of Eltroxin and used to chew them.
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countrybumpkin

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #48 on: December 03, 2016, 04:28:20 PM »

Countrybumpkin - have you talked to your GP about a discussion with an endo.?  Or find out which Hospital locally has the appropriate dept. and ring the Secretary for advice?  A one-off private appt. might be the way to go?

If the thyroid is stable on treatment then you cannot see an endo, you really do need to have complications or they are usure of diagnosis etc to get a GP referral.  I have twice been unstable and a GP has said if this does not settle then they would do more indepth blood tests and refer me but each time it has settled down itself.  HOrmonal upheaval is a very common reason for a stable thyroid to become wobbly ;D   
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Katejo

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #49 on: December 03, 2016, 04:59:11 PM »

Countrybumpkin - have you talked to your GP about a discussion with an endo.?  Or find out which Hospital locally has the appropriate dept. and ring the Secretary for advice?  A one-off private appt. might be the way to go?

If the thyroid is stable on treatment then you cannot see an endo, you really do need to have complications or they are usure of diagnosis etc to get a GP referral.  I have twice been unstable and a GP has said if this does not settle then they would do more indepth blood tests and refer me but each time it has settled down itself.  HOrmonal upheaval is a very common reason for a stable thyroid to become wobbly ;D
A year ago I wanted a referral to an endo to check whether certain symptoms were thyroid related but my GP was very unwilling. However I then had an outpatient appt. with a neurologist. No problems was found but the neurologist advised my GP that my thyroid needed a review so I got the referral. That has taken until now to complete. I was told by the endo that only patients with overactive thyroid probs were supposed to be under an endo. Underactive is supposed to be managed by the GP!
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babyjane

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #50 on: December 03, 2016, 05:19:00 PM »


I was told by the endo that only patients with overactive thyroid probs were supposed to be under an endo. Underactive is supposed to be managed by the GP!

I fear you have been misinformed as my endo has a lot of patients with unstable UAT and Hashimoto's on his list including ones like myself in the sub group that do not convert.  Of course if I had stabilised on thyroxine in the beginning like my mother I would never have asked for the referral in the first place.  Mother was managed by her GP and never had any problems.

Perhaps it depends on the area (one reason we don't move house) and individual budgets.  All I know is that there are a lot of patients, mostly ladies, struggling with thyroid issues and not getting proper treatment. The fact that thyroid disease gives free prescriptions shows that it is something that needs to be taken seriously.
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countrybumpkin

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #51 on: December 03, 2016, 05:57:55 PM »

I remember during training that one of the trainers said that even though someones blood tests on medication may be totally within normal range our bodies cannot convert thyroxine to every single hormone that the thyroid naturally produces but it should convert to the most important ones for life and in my case this is so true. I appear to have no metabolism ;D ;D and have to eat very strict diet and am still a few stones overweight, I have the dry skin, weird eyebrows. raised cholesterol that are all part and parcel of not right thyroids. 
But I am very glad that they managed to synthesize thyroxine even if it does not to a 100% job. 
Certainly in my area, a goitre or overactive thyroid or if you develop antibodies to thyroxine medication gets you an endo referral but otherwise its the GP
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babyjane

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #52 on: December 03, 2016, 06:58:52 PM »

I appear to have no metabolism ;D ;D and have to eat very strict diet and am still a few stones overweight, I have the dry skin, weird eyebrows. raised cholesterol that are all part and parcel of not right thyroids. 


I guess I am used to my chap who would not be happy with this at all and would tweak your dose until it was the best it could be for your individual case and you were as well as possible.  He doesn't deal in increments of 25 or 50mcg and I don't take the same dose every day but average 650mcg a week of thyroxine (100mcg for 5 days out of 7 and 75mcg for 2 days out of 7) and 5mcg liothyronine twice a day. In the past I have been on as much as 132.5mcg and as low as 62.5mcg.

People who are euthyroid don't secrete the same amount of thyroid hormone every day so it stands to reason that the amount we take depends on our activity levels and physical needs.

I would dearly love to see all thyroid patients treated properly.
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Dyan

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #53 on: December 03, 2016, 07:14:41 PM »

Interesting posts.
With the NHS cutbacks it seems some surgeries are prescribing the cheapest medication or not the one to suit the patient. I feel this is happening at my surgery.
If I get no joy on Monday when I see the GP I will look to having a private health check.
I know something's not right with me. Whether it is thyroid or depression the symptoms are there.
Depression is on the list of symptoms amongst others that I'm experiencing. Who knows which it is? I just want to feel well.
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CLKD

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #54 on: December 03, 2016, 07:15:44 PM »

Thyroid is a hormone so it can affect mood !
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countrybumpkin

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #55 on: December 03, 2016, 07:48:49 PM »

Babyjane. I sooo agree with what you have said.  Quite a few years ago in usa they were trying to come up with a meter like diabetics use that thyroid patients could test their blood every morning and adjust their medication just like my insulin dependant husband does with his insulin. They did actually devise a meter but it never got any further as far as I know but to me this would make perfect sense. If diabetics can moniter and control their own medication I feel we should be able to as well ;)
My GP was happy for me to have tests every 3-6 months and I would  get the results and then decide if I thought I needed to tweek my dose and as long as I told him and he agreed he was fine but he has now left and the other GP's are very much by the tick list >:(   
CKLD  all hormones affect mood! 
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babyjane

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #56 on: December 03, 2016, 08:00:19 PM »

All the best countrybumpkin.  It'a been nice to share ideas and experience with you  :)
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countrybumpkin

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #57 on: December 03, 2016, 08:32:11 PM »

All the best countrybumpkin.  It'a been nice to share ideas and experience with you  :)

Same here :)
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Katejo

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #58 on: December 03, 2016, 08:56:10 PM »


I was told by the endo that only patients with overactive thyroid probs were supposed to be under an endo. Underactive is supposed to be managed by the GP!

I fear you have been misinformed as my endo has a lot of patients with unstable UAT and Hashimoto's on his list including ones like myself in the sub group that do not convert.  Of course if I had stabilised on thyroxine in the beginning like my mother I would never have asked for the referral in the first place.  Mother was managed by her GP and never had any problems.

Perhaps it depends on the area (one reason we don't move house) and individual budgets.  All I know is that there are a lot of patients, mostly ladies, struggling with thyroid issues and not getting proper treatment. The fact that thyroid disease gives free prescriptions shows that it is something that needs to be taken seriously.
  Most of my life I haven't had problems though, with hindsight, my recurrent throat and chest infections prior to my goitre removal were probably thyroid related. They stopped/reduced to a very normal level straight afterwards. My dosage has remained almost unchanged and having it monitored by the GP has mostly been fine. However, since menopause, I have wanted to get it checked. This has now happened but I am not 100% convinced that my aching calves/feet aren't connected to the thyroid. I am now taking extra Vit D but haven't noticed a difference. The GP insists that it is muscular and i need to do Pilates or see a physio. The aching is worse first thing in the morning.
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babyjane

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #59 on: December 04, 2016, 08:40:46 AM »

All the best with your GP appointment tomorrow Dyan.

Katejo the thyroid levels can fluctuate with the hormonal upheaval of menopause and need to be monitored more closely.  I wish GPs knew this  :(

Hypothyroidism, in whatever form, is serious and that is why you get free prescriptions and yet it is not taken seriously.  It needs to be monitored as closely as diabetes.  Untreated it can lead to coma and death the same as diabetes can.  Poorly treated it can take a toll on the body both physically and mentally.

My endo explained the thyroid as the leader of the orchestra, the orchestra being all the different systems of the body.  For me, in the beginning, it affected my digestive system, my blood count (severe anaemia) and my reproductive system.  I still believe that if it had been diagnosed sooner I might have avoided a hysterectomy, not that I have ever minded saying goodbye to periods, it made the menopause easier to deal with.
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