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Author Topic: Underactive thyroid  (Read 12143 times)

Dyan

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #15 on: November 30, 2016, 03:00:18 PM »

I've been on Ads for 12 years.
Just got my thyroid blood test result and all I got was "satisfactory" ???
My GP not in tomorrow or Friday so I'll have to ring at 8 Monday morning to see him at my other surgery.
Would my thyroid have been corrected on 25mcg thyroxine over the 6 months?
I need to se my GP to discuss this and regular blood tests.
Why am I still feeling crap?
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CLKD

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #16 on: November 30, 2016, 03:03:41 PM »

Because your immune system is out of kilter?  Thyroid dis-function can cause the patient to feel awful: either running themselves ragged 24/7 or completely worn out!  Be kind to YOU!
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Changes can be scarey, even when we want them!

Dyan

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #17 on: November 30, 2016, 03:07:53 PM »

Thank you CLKD.
With a satisfactory result do I need more thyroxine or not?
I'm so confused with this whole thyroid thingy :-\
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Dyan

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #18 on: November 30, 2016, 03:15:27 PM »

I only got a "satisfactory" didn't think to ask for anything else. WhT do I ask for anyway?
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Dyan

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #19 on: November 30, 2016, 04:11:42 PM »

Dr will ring me back on levels before 6.30 today as receptionist not allowed to give out info other than satisfactory etc etc.

I have been on HRT for 11 years. Sandrena estrogen gel & mirena coil.
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Lizab

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #20 on: November 30, 2016, 04:36:33 PM »

I don't think anyone has yet mentioned how the thyroid can kind of surge and sputter when it starts going. So even if you're getting checked regularly,  which you should be, there will be days or weeks when you feel better or worse as you essentially cycle through being hypo-, hyper-, and normal. It can take a while for that to settle and you won't feel good all the time until it does. Now that my ovaries are apparently playing that same surge and sputter game, I can't imagine how hard it must be for women who run into thyroid issues for the first time during peri. That's a lot to try to balance at once. My thyroid started going out in my late 20s, so thankfully it's remained stable through peri, with the exception of when the doctor tried to tinker with my dose to tackle my peri symptoms.
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countrybumpkin

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #21 on: November 30, 2016, 07:50:45 PM »

Whenever you ring up for test results no matter they say normal or okay always ask for your TSH result and your freeT4 result and what the reference range is as this is all in front of them on the path report.  If you go to see your GP about this then again ask for this information.
If it is satisfactory this means that your TSH FReeT4 and T4 will be within normal reference range for that laboratory but if you are at one end of the other of reference range then you may want to increase or decrease dose to see what happens.
An example is - my lab reference range for TSH is 0.3 to 5.6.  So if someone has a TSH of O.6 then tney are bordeline overactive and need to reduce dosage but if their TSH is 5.5 then they are borderline underactive and need to increase dose.  Hope you can follow this.
So ask your GP exactly where your results are on the reference range and if one end or other then discuss altering dosage. If they really are normal then its more than possible your symptoms re not to do with your thyroid and Dr will want to look further.
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Dyan

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #22 on: November 30, 2016, 10:01:06 PM »

Think I've got you countrybumpkin :)

The receptionist rang me tonight and said that a read out of my results will be at the surgery for me to collect in the morning. So I will look then and get back to you all.
Thanks ladies :)
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countrybumpkin

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #23 on: November 30, 2016, 10:39:13 PM »

Glad I haven't confused you, in thyroid tests it always seems as if everything is opposite of what you would imagine! Good luck tomorrow
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CLKD

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #24 on: November 30, 2016, 10:55:00 PM »

Maybe ask if a Practice Nurse can read through them with you?  Otherwise you'll be none the wiser  ::).  Sometimes with thyroid function tests 'within normal limits' isn't enough, if a patient is still feeling unwell then levels need to be checked and medication taken into consideration.

Sleep tight!
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Changes can be scarey, even when we want them!

Dyan

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #25 on: December 01, 2016, 01:18:59 PM »

Got my results back in black & white and you're right CLKD I'm none the wiser. :-\
Haven't got a clue what they mean :-\
There was no doctor or nurse at the surgery, just the receptionist, as they closed at 12.30 today.

I will list the results for anyone who can work it out. Here goes:

Serum ferritin level(iron) ( XE24r)-     32ug/L (23.0-300.0)

Serum TSH level (XaELV - 2.64mu/L (0.35-3.5)

Serum free trilodothyronine ( XaERq) T3 - 4.0pmol/L (3.8-6.0)

Serum free T4 level (XaERr) - 14pmol/L (8.0-21.0)

I have a list of a full blood count too but it's quite long and again I haven't a clue :-\

If anyone can work the above out I'd appreciate it so I know what I'm talking about on Monday when I see my GP.

 :thankyou: X
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Dyan

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #26 on: December 01, 2016, 03:21:03 PM »

Thanks for that menomale but after looking at the link I'm even more confused ::)
It looks like the readings on there were in the US so probably different to here in the uk. I could be wrong. Still confused though :-\ ;D

My iron is 32ug/L(23.0-300.0)
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Dyan

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #27 on: December 01, 2016, 04:35:05 PM »

No problem. I get confused at the simplest of things :-\  meno/thyroid brain ;D

I'll look forward to the PM and thank you for your help.
You are so good :) X
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countrybumpkin

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #28 on: December 01, 2016, 05:03:05 PM »

Every single nhs lab has its own reference range so comparing with anything else is not alot of use.  Your T3 is still okay just at lower end of normal and your other thyroid results are bang on okay.
Re T3, in the past your Dr could prescribe T3 medication if you had a very definite deficiency which you don't but recently the nhs will no longer fund T3 medication because of a huge price hike by the manufacturer and at present all the nhs is doing is upping the thyroxine dosage for affected people which is not much use as their problem is they can't convert thyroxine to T4.  Don't know if you know this but your body converts thyroxine tablets  to a usable element T3.   
Ferritin is your bodies store of iron and not your blood count.  Most lab refernces for this are 20-30 but you have put 300?????   If your 300 is a typing error then your fine your stores are on the high side but if 300 is correct then you are low side of normal but still okay.  Mine is always 21 which is borderline low but as mine is always like that and my blood count is always at top end of normal its fine.
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babyjane

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Re: Underactive thyroid
« Reply #29 on: December 01, 2016, 07:17:10 PM »

recently the nhs will no longer fund T3 medication because of a huge price hike by the manufacturer

with respect countrybumpkin this is not strictly true and could be alarmist.

If T3 is recommended or prescribed by a consultant endocrinologist then the GP can prescribe it.  I am in the 15% sub group of patients that cannot convert thyroxine to T3 and have been on T4/T3 combination therapy for many years.  I see my endocrinologist (who is at the top of his field) every 6 months and my GP prescribes my Liothyronine alongside my thyroxine.

I am very fortunate to be looked after by him.
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