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Author Topic: posterior vitreous detachment  (Read 9299 times)

Pauline

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posterior vitreous detachment
« on: November 28, 2011, 01:04:18 PM »

Hello. I have recently experienced an increase in floaters in my vision and occasional bright flashes in the field of sight. A comprehensive eye exam on Saturday revealed PVD where the vitreous gel comes away from the back of the eye and causes such symptoms as floaters and flashes.
I have been referred to the eye clinic at the local hospital for more checks as, although the retina is fine at present, PVD can increase the risk of retinal detachment.
Just a caution ladies. If you think you are seeing more or differently configured floaters it would be a good idea to get a check done.
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ariadne

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Re: posterior vitreous detachment
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2011, 01:34:37 PM »

How frightening for you Pauline. Well done you for getting it checked and I hope everything turns out OK after your referral.

ariadne xx
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CLKD

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Re: posterior vitreous detachment
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2011, 07:53:40 PM »

It may lead to surgery.  But the surgery is new so make sure that the Surgeon really knows what he is doing!  I had a coloured floater briefly yesterday but on blinking it went.  I noted a lot after surgery in the 1990s.  It was like a flea dirt on the page whilst reading  >:( which I kept trying to brush away.
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Changes can be scarey, even when we want them!

countrybumpkin

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Re: posterior vitreous detachment
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2011, 10:30:29 PM »

Having been born with severe congenital short sight I am I'm afraid very experienced with eye problems >:(

Sorry to hear you have got the complications of pvd. This is an entirely natural part of ageing and in most people they never know it has happened - it usually happens in your 50's or 60's but if you are severely short sighted as I am then it happens in your 40's.

One of my eyes had same symptoms as yours and I too had to go to the eye clinic as emergency and my retina was fine BUT about 2 weeks after it happened I suddenly woke up one morning and it was as if my eye was full of cloudy lumps and another rush back to eye clinic and I had the added complication that my vitrious had gone into big cloudy clumps and was badly affecting my vision, I had to move my eye briskly from one side to other to get clear vision for a few seconds.  So please do not ignore this if it happens to you.  The only treatment for this is to have a vitrectomy where they take out the cloudy virious and replace it with synthetic but its a risky op for your retina. 

I don't mean to worry anyone and as I say these complications are much more common in someone like me who has very severe short sight.  thankfully my other eye did its stuff and the pvd had no effect at all to my eye which is how it should be.

I now have cataracts but due to the high risk of surgery for me personally I will not be having them done until I am almost blind ( I am partially sighted at moment) as I need to have nothing to lose and this is when they will do the vitrectomy as well.

As has been said please dont anyone  ignore flashes in their vision especially if its like lightening at the edges of their vision and worse in the dark.
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Pauline

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Re: posterior vitreous detachment
« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2011, 09:15:54 AM »

Thanks for the replies and especially to countrybumpkin for comprehensive info. I am awaiting the hospital appt but have, so far, had no other symptoms. This getting older business is very tiresome!
Take care all.
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Trey

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Re: posterior vitreous detachment
« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2011, 08:59:31 PM »

Hi Countrybumpkin,  just one positive note, or sort of one.  When I was a RN at a big teaching hospital a lot of my diabetic patients had vitrectomies due to type one/insulin dependent diabetes, and to my knowledge all were successful.  These were, however, (gosh I hate to say this), but they were usually younger patients.  Oh damn, that ruined it.  I am in no way minimizing your serious concerns, but hopefully will take away just a bit of the fear.  I think all surgeries are serious and just cancelled one because the doctor could not assure me I would not get a deep vein thrombosis.  We agreed when the pain outweighed the fear, we'd do it.  So I do understand.  So sorry you've had these series of issues.

Pauline, glad it's going ok and even gladder you checked things out.  I feel like an old used car - all my parts are wearing out and need replacing. :(
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countrybumpkin

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Re: posterior vitreous detachment
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2011, 12:44:50 PM »

Thanks Trey - I know that the risks of the ops they will do on my eyes are small about 2% but as any error means blindness its not something I am willing to risk until I have nothing to lose ::).

Thankfully I have an early retired husband at home so have lots of help but it would be a different matter if I lived alone I would be off for the ops, not being able to drive is the worst bit and mistaking public toilet doors for ladies when it says gents and being caught peering at the door just as a man walks out :D
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Pauline

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Re: posterior vitreous detachment
« Reply #7 on: December 14, 2011, 10:36:22 AM »

Going to the eye dept at hospital this afternoon for more tests. Will let you know. Had quite a difficult time. Andrew has had pneumonia and was in hospital for five days. He is now home and a heap better but having to go steady. I love my dog and sheep but they are an extra task when you are ill!! I also have a weird bug. Not really a cold but not really right either. Slight temp and weariness. Added to meno symptoms this makes things hard.
Sorry for the moan. I know there are many others worse off but if someone kicks you once should you always be thankful that they haven't kicked you twice?!!
Take care.

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Bette

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Re: posterior vitreous detachment
« Reply #8 on: December 14, 2011, 01:53:35 PM »

 :hug: Pauline - sounds like you need it. And you are not moaning, just having a rough time.  :bighug:
Bette x
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If you want a thing done well, get a couple of old broads to do it. Bette Davis.

Pauline

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Re: posterior vitreous detachment
« Reply #9 on: December 14, 2011, 07:16:49 PM »

Thanks Bette. The hospital confirmed there is no retinal detachment or tear so that is good news. In a few more weeks the vitreous will have fully detached and no longer be a threat to the retina.
Thanks for all the messages. You are a kind bunch.
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Bette

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Re: posterior vitreous detachment
« Reply #10 on: December 14, 2011, 07:40:06 PM »

That's such good news.  :congrats:
Now take care of yourself and get rid of that bug. Hope that you and Andrew have a nice calm Xmas and are able to recover properly.
Bette x
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If you want a thing done well, get a couple of old broads to do it. Bette Davis.

ariadne

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Re: posterior vitreous detachment
« Reply #11 on: December 14, 2011, 08:04:33 PM »

Pleased to hear the news about your eye Pauline and hope that you shake off that bug in time to enjoy a peaceful Christmas  :)

aridane xx
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Pauline

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Re: posterior vitreous detachment
« Reply #12 on: December 15, 2011, 06:37:01 PM »

Thanks all. Christmas seems to have crept up even faster this year. Have to get the cards written this weekend. I hope you all have a good time and are able to enjoy good company and good health. My warmest wishes to you all for a happy, peaceful and festive season.
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